news

Parashat Vayelech

Shabbat Table Talk Parashat Vayelech– Erev Shabbat 14 September, 2018 Torah portion: Deuteronomy 31:1-30 Haftarah : Hosea 14:2-10; Micah 7:18-20; Joel 2:15-27 Download This week’s reading from the Torah, Vayelech which means “and he went” tells us that Moses is...

Parashat Ki Teitzei

Shabbat Table Talk Parashat Ki Teitzei –Erev Shabbat 24 August 2018 Torah portion:Deuteronomy 21:10-25:19 Haftarah: Isaiah 54:1-55:5   Download   In Parashat Ki Teitzei, Moses gives the laws regarding individuals, their families and their neighbors. This is in contrast...

Parashat Shoftim

Shabbat Table Talk ParashatShof’tim—Erev Shabbat 17August, 2018 Week of12– 18August, 2018 Torah portion:Deut. 16:18 – 21:9Haftarah: Isaiah 51:12 - 52:12   Download   “Justice, justice shall you pursue…”   This parashah is devoted almost entirely to the theme of justice....

Parashat Ekev

Shabbat Table Talk Parashat Eikev - Erev Shabbat    3  August  2018  Week of  29  July  –  4  August  2018 Torah portion: Deuteronomy 7:12-11:25  Haftarah: Isaiah 49:14-51:3  Author: Mary  Ann  Payne   Download   The Israelites are camped east of Jericho on the plain of Moab, preparing to cross the Jordan and enter Canaan. Moses’ address to the people reminds us of a wise and loving father, as he extols the blessings of  a  ”good  land”,  and  the  seven  species,  ...”a  land  of  wheat  and  barley,  of  vines,  figs  and pomegranates, a land of olive trees and honey.” (Deut    8:7-8) In an impassioned plea, Moses warns of the danger of such plenty; that if the people forget the gifts of G_d’s goodness, they might forget G_d Himself. That seven species are named should not surprise us; seven being the number which denotes perfection/completion. In our day let us draw sustenance from these gifts through reflecting on each.   Wheat: The staff of life, a prized grain and cereal, a symbol of abundance. Wheat harvest is first mentioned in Gen  30:14. Scripture reports Isaac sowed seed and reaped a hundredfold (Gen  26:12).   Barley: Ruth  (1:22)    arrived  in Bethlehem as  the barley harvest  began and gleaned in  the fields behind the  harvesters.  In  biblical  times  barley,  not  as  valued  as  wheat,  was  often  used  for animal fodder. Having less gluten than wheat it produced a heavier bread which was harder to digest.   Vines: Grapes, the fruit of the vine “Gladdens the heart”  (Ps  104:15) and “Makes life merry.” (Ecc 10:19). Noah planted grapes after the flood  (Gen  9:20)   and also suffered the consequences of drinking too much! Even with careful cultivation, it took five years for the first clusters of grapes to appear and ten years for a marketable crop. Viticulture was work for a settled people, not nomads and because growing took so long, the cultivation of grapes became a symbol of peace.   Figs: The sugar in figs makes them a quick source of energy. (1  Sam:  30:12) Figs are dried and eaten on  journeys,   or  pressed  and  squeezed  into  a cake.  (1    Chron    12:40)    The  fig  tree  lent  its  name  to  two villages  on  the  Mount  of  Olives:  Bethphage,  Beit  Pagi (House  of  Unripe  Figs)  and  Bethany, Beit Te’enah (House of the Fig). In (1  Kings  4:25) figs are seen as an image of tranquillity.   Pomegranates: It  is  said that  the  Talmud is as full  of  good deeds as  the  pomegranate is full of seeds. Pomegranates alternate with little gold bells to decorate the High Priest’s robe (Ex  28:33-34)  and adorn the capitals of the pillars at the doors of the Holy of Holies in Solomon’s Temple  (1Kgs  7:18)....

Scroll to top